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OP-ED

California’s Bold Solar Energy Vision | June 18, 2018

Post-Paris Agreement: FREE’S Focus on Subnational Climate Action | January 15, 2016

China’s Cap-and-Trade Decisions | February 24, 2016. [Energy Central]

Why the U.S. Urgently Needs to Invest in a Modern Energy System | September 15, 2018 [Energy Central]

Mobilizing Public and Private Capital for Clean Energy Financing | April 4, 2015 [Energy Central]

Understanding Obama’s Budget Proposal for Clean Energy and Climate Investments | February 17, 2015 [Energy Central]

Europe Loses Billions in Badly Sited Renewable Power Plants | January 26, 2015 [Energy Central]

Impacts of Shale Boom in the U.S. and Beyond | February 10, 2015 [Energy Central]

Drivers of Clean Energy Finance | March 13, 2012

Rebalancing the Economics of Greening | January 7, 2012

The Self-Organizing Smarts of Sustainable Cities | September 26, 2011

Media Quotes:

“Green Growth,” In Stay Ahead of the Competition: Using Market Intelligence to Shape Your Portfolio, PM Network, Project Management Institute, Vol. 25 No. 12, ISSN 1040-8754, December 16, 2011

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The energy market in the United States is undergoing a dramatic transformation, driven by technological advancement, market dynamics, and better policies and laws—none of which was a decade ago. Venture capitalists made huge profits from the computing boom of the 1980s, the internet boom of the 1990s, and now think the next boom will happen on the back of energy. These past booms, however, were fed by cheap energy: coal was cheap; natural gas was low-priced; and apart from the events following the 1973 Arab oil embargo and the 1979 Iranian Revolution, oil was comparatively cheap. However, in the space of the past decade, all that has changed. New resource finds, primarily shale resources from states such as Texas, Oklahoma, North Dakota, and Pennsylvania, exert pressure on the prices of oil and gas. At the same time, there is a growing concern of negative externalities associated with these fossil fuels. Read more>>

President Obama has released a $4 trillion budget proposal for FY 2016. It contains a range of programs designed to encourage deployment of the next generation clean energy and energy efficiency technologies. Here are the top five things to know about the budget in terms of clean energy and environmental investments.

1. Clean Power State Incentive Fund
The U.S. President proposes a $4 billion incentive fund to encourage states to make faster and deeper cuts in carbon emissions from electricity, than would be required under the Clean Power Plan. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is to administer the Clean Power State Incentive Fund, which would enable states to invest in activities that advance and complement the agency’s Clean Power Plan. The administration outlines several goals, including addressing impacts from environmental pollution in low-income communities to supporting businesses to catalyze investment in renewable energy, energy efficiency and combined heat and power. The budget also includes $239 million to support reductions in greenhouse gas emissions programs at the EPA. In particular, $25 million would be used to help states develop their Clean Power Plan strategies. Read more>>

Photo: Shutterstock

The New Climate Economy (NCE), a flagship project of the Global Commission on the Economy and Climate has released a report documenting how urbanization drives of productivity and growth in the global economy. The report titled, ‘Better Growth, Better Climate,’ observes that as the global economy undergoes a deep structural transformation the next 15 years will be marked by: (i) rapid global economic expansion by more than half, (ii) rapid technological advancement that will have profound impact on both businesses and lives, (iii) migration of a billion more people into cities, and (iv) investment of nearly US$90 trillion in infrastructure in asset intensive sectors mainly in urban, land use and energy systems.

To overcome market, policy and institutional barriers to low-carbon growth, the report recommends harnessing three key “drivers of change,” notably: raising resource efficiency, investing in infrastructure and stimulating innovation in new business models, technologies, business models and social-technical innovations and practices to stimulate both growth and emissions reduction.

 

Speaking at the launch of the report, Philipp Rode, the Executive Director of LSE Cities and Senior Research Fellow at the London School of Economics and Political Science said that:

dispersed peripheralized development of many developing world cities in particular leads to a very regressive form of urban development replicating income and wealth inequalities by limiting access to common goods such as healthcare, better schools, and public transport.

The report identifies better urbanization, better development, and better coordination of critical economic systems as vital drivers of change in cities.

2

The report recommends a 10-point global action plan, including:

  • integrating climate into core economic decision-making processes to accelerate low-carbon transformation;
  • phasing out subsidies for hydrocarbon fuels, and incentives for urban sprawl;
  • introduce strong, predictable carbon prices;
  • pursue a strong, lasting and equitable international climate treaty;
  • strengthen incentives for long-term investment in forestry and forest protection;
  • reduce capital costs for low-carbon infrastructure investments;
  • scale up innovation in key low-carbon and climate-resilient technologies;
  • emphasize on developing a connected and compact cities paradigm;
  • accelerate fuel switching away from polluting coal-fired power generation to low carbon fuels; and
  • restore lost or degraded forests and agricultural lands by 2030.

The unconventional oil and gas boom has shaken up energy markets in the U.S. and beyond. Across many American states, the energy sector is experiencing a number of changes far larger than in its history including improvements in policies, business models, technologies, and investment options to make energy cleaner, more plentiful and diversified, cheaper to store and capable of handling increased demand more intelligently. Technological advances have significantly enhanced production of oil and gas from shale, turning the U.S. into a major oil producer, with most of the new production coming from unconventional sources. Read more>>

A new paper strategy by the World Bank Group sets a new direction for energy sector investments focusing on expanding energy access and sustainable energy. Along with expanding access to energy, the Energy Sector Directions Paper focuses on accelerating energy efficiency and renewable energy development as per the Sustainable Energy for All initiative’s 2030 goal for doubling global energy efficiency measures and the global renewable energy mix share.

“As part of a drive for universal access, financial solutions or guarantees will be made available for the most feasible energy options for the poor and for people living in fragile and conflict-affected states. If short-term options include those with moderate or high greenhouse gas emissions, complementary support will also be provided in the medium term to harness lower-emission options.

In rural, remote or isolated areas, off-grid solutions based on renewable energy combined with energy- efficient technologies could be the most rapid means of providing cost-effective energy services. Engagement in cleaner cooking and heating solutions will grow.”

wbinvestment

The new energy strategy paper will limit financing of new coal-fired power plants to “rare circumstances,” and only to countries with “no feasible alternatives” to coal. This follows President Obama’s “climate action” speech at Georgetown University last month calling for an end to public financing of dirty coal plants abroad.

“The WBG will provide financial support for greenfield coal power generation projects only in rare circumstances. Considerations such as meeting basic energy needs in countries with no feasible alternatives to coal and a lack of financing for coal power would define such rare cases.”

David Rogers, Executive Director of BRITE conference, which stands for brands, innovation and technology, hosted by the Center on Global Brand Leadership at Columbia Business School, discusses the challenges and promise of big data and how companies can master it to drive innovation and generate customer insight.

Talk by Jochen Harnisch, division head of the competence center environment and climate at KFW, at Stanford‘s Precourt Institute for Energy on financing required for global green energy transformation.

KFW is the development bank of Germany and Dr. Harnisch coordinates strategy and product development for climate protection and adaptation to climate change in developing and industrializing countries.

Here’s a great video of a speech delivered by Lord Nicholas Stern and sponsored by the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and World Resources Institute (WRI). Lord Stern, who is the chairman of the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment at the London School of Economics, explained how climate risks have changed six years after the publication of the Stern Review report, and what organizations and governments can do to transition to a low-carbon economy future. For more, check out the transcript of the speech and IMF Managing Director Christine Lagarde’s introductory remarks, and Stern Review .

For those interested in the relationship between equity markets and unemployment, here is an interesting chart by The Economist that sums up that ‘synching feeling’.

One thing is clear, producing goods in cheap labor markets and exporting them to high valued economies only end up eroding long-term viability of these advanced economies. Therefore, even if the action is highly profitable and looks good on the balance sheet (to outsource production of some goods to cheap labor markets), this is but a short-term solution with serious long-term economic consequences.
stockmarket_and_unemployment

In other news:
WSJ: Chained CPI, stocks and unemployment, imports
CNBC: Stock market to navigate negatives of earnings and economy

As the payoff from investment in advanced-analytics management and big data revolution becomes real, the art and science of delivery is on the upswing as institutions share knowledge, tools and experience in problem solving. For instance, public policy institutions are full of good ideas on how to solve complex social problems, improve STEM pedagogy and student learning, cure diseases, and produce energy (at scale, efficiently, and sustainably). But what has been missing in this process is the ability to implement simple, pragmatic and scalable solutions to effect positive social change. This seems to be changing, pretty fast, however, as organizations integrate their stovepipes of data across operations and sectors to provide powerful insights.

Speaking at this year’s annual meeting plenary session, World Bank Group President Jim Yong Kim addressed the facts and processes germaine to the next frontier in advancing the science of delivery. “Effective delivery demands context-specific knowledge. It requires constant adjustments, a willingness to take smart risks, and a relentless focus on the details of implementation,” he observed.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=cGz8gBctezo

McKinsey has also developed an anthology of leading delivery models by social thinkers and practitioners in health care, smart energy, financial services, governance, and food security to improve development outcomes.

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