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Technology enabled smart city

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How can a technology enabled city with a smarter infrastructure (water, energy and travel) provide services efficiently? In this video Chris Kohlmann from the City of Dubuque, Iowa discusses how IBM Research and Watson technology enabled a Smarter City program. The City of Dubuque partnered with IBM Research to carry out a smarter water project, smarter electric including electric meters and smarter travel.

Why the U.S. urgently needs to invest in a modern energy system

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In a speech commemorating the thirty-fifth anniversary of the International Energy Agency (IEA) in 2009, former U.S. secretary of state, Henry Kissinger recalled how the energy crisis of 1970s awakened the world “to a new challenge that would require both creative thinking and international cooperation.” He explained that as “global demand continues to grow, investment […]

In a speech commemorating the thirty-fifth anniversary of the International Energy Agency (IEA) in 2009, former U.S. secretary of state, Henry Kissinger recalled how the energy crisis of 1970s awakened the world “to a new challenge that would require both creative thinking and international cooperation.” He explained that as “global demand continues to grow, investment cycles, technologies, and supporting infrastructure will be critical.” As a top U.S. diplomat in the 1970s, Kissinger is credited with promoting energy security as a third pillar of the international order through a trifecta of initiatives to bolster incentives to energy producers to increase their supplies, encourage rational and prudent consumption of existing supplies, and improve development of alternative energy sources. These efforts contributed to the establishment of the IEA in 1974 as a principal institutional mechanism for enhancing global energy cooperation among industrialized nations. Read more>>

Mobilizing public and private capital

On August 13, 2015, in Infrastructure Investment & Finance, by Joe Nyangon
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The energy market in the United States is undergoing a dramatic transformation, driven by technological advancement, market dynamics, and better policies and laws—none of which was a decade ago. Venture capitalists made huge profits from the computing boom of the 1980s, the internet boom of the 1990s, and now think the next boom will happen […]

The energy market in the United States is undergoing a dramatic transformation, driven by technological advancement, market dynamics, and better policies and laws—none of which was a decade ago. Venture capitalists made huge profits from the computing boom of the 1980s, the internet boom of the 1990s, and now think the next boom will happen on the back of energy. These past booms, however, were fed by cheap energy: coal was cheap; natural gas was low-priced; and apart from the events following the 1973 Arab oil embargo and the 1979 Iranian Revolution, oil was comparatively cheap. However, in the space of the past decade, all that has changed. New resource finds, primarily shale resources from states such as Texas, Oklahoma, North Dakota, and Pennsylvania, exert pressure on the prices of oil and gas. At the same time, there is a growing concern of negative externalities associated with these fossil fuels. Read more>>

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Obama’s budget proposals for clean energy and climate investments

On July 17, 2015, in Utilities of the Future: Engineering Economic Systems, by Joe Nyangon
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President Obama has released a $4 trillion budget proposal for FY 2016. It contains a range of programs designed to encourage deployment of the next generation clean energy and energy efficiency technologies. Here are the top five things to know about the budget in terms of clean energy and environmental investments. 1. Clean Power State […]

President Obama has released a $4 trillion budget proposal for FY 2016. It contains a range of programs designed to encourage deployment of the next generation clean energy and energy efficiency technologies. Here are the top five things to know about the budget in terms of clean energy and environmental investments.

1. Clean Power State Incentive Fund
The U.S. President proposes a $4 billion incentive fund to encourage states to make faster and deeper cuts in carbon emissions from electricity, than would be required under the Clean Power Plan. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is to administer the Clean Power State Incentive Fund, which would enable states to invest in activities that advance and complement the agency’s Clean Power Plan. The administration outlines several goals, including addressing impacts from environmental pollution in low-income communities to supporting businesses to catalyze investment in renewable energy, energy efficiency and combined heat and power. The budget also includes $239 million to support reductions in greenhouse gas emissions programs at the EPA. In particular, $25 million would be used to help states develop their Clean Power Plan strategies. Read more>>

Photo: Shutterstock

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Financing the global green energy transformation

On August 3, 2013, in Project & Infrastructure Finance, by Joe Nyangon
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Talk by Jochen Harnisch, division head of the competence center environment and climate at KFW, at Stanford‘s Precourt Institute for Energy on financing required for global green energy transformation. KFW is the development bank of Germany and Dr. Harnisch coordinates strategy and product development for climate protection and adaptation to climate change in developing and industrializing countries.

Talk by Jochen Harnisch, division head of the competence center environment and climate at KFW, at Stanford‘s Precourt Institute for Energy on financing required for global green energy transformation.

KFW is the development bank of Germany and Dr. Harnisch coordinates strategy and product development for climate protection and adaptation to climate change in developing and industrializing countries.

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