Archives

China’s cap-and-trade decisions

On December 27, 2015, in Power System Economics, by Joe Nyangon
0

In the lead-up to the 2015 Paris climate change conference, policymakers stressed the need for creation of integrated carbon markets and called for linking new climate financing mechanisms with the United Nations-organized Green Climate Fund (GCF) based in South Korea. Both the U.S. and China have committed to accelerating the transition to low-carbon development internationally. […]

Photo: Beijing’s financial district. Sean Pavone /Shutterstock.com

Photo: Beijing’s financial district. Sean Pavone / Shutterstock.com

In the lead-up to the 2015 Paris climate change conference, policymakers stressed the need for creation of integrated carbon markets and called for linking new climate financing mechanisms with the United Nations-organized Green Climate Fund (GCF) based in South Korea. Both the U.S. and China have committed to accelerating the transition to low-carbon development internationally. Through a $3 billion per year pledge to GCF by the U.S. and a new annual $3.1 billion climate finance guarantee by China to support other developing countries to combat climate change, the two countries have committed to enhance multilateral climate cooperation. Read more>>

Why the U.S. urgently needs to invest in a modern energy system

0

In a speech commemorating the thirty-fifth anniversary of the International Energy Agency (IEA) in 2009, former U.S. secretary of state, Henry Kissinger recalled how the energy crisis of 1970s awakened the world “to a new challenge that would require both creative thinking and international cooperation.” He explained that as “global demand continues to grow, investment […]

In a speech commemorating the thirty-fifth anniversary of the International Energy Agency (IEA) in 2009, former U.S. secretary of state, Henry Kissinger recalled how the energy crisis of 1970s awakened the world “to a new challenge that would require both creative thinking and international cooperation.” He explained that as “global demand continues to grow, investment cycles, technologies, and supporting infrastructure will be critical.” As a top U.S. diplomat in the 1970s, Kissinger is credited with promoting energy security as a third pillar of the international order through a trifecta of initiatives to bolster incentives to energy producers to increase their supplies, encourage rational and prudent consumption of existing supplies, and improve development of alternative energy sources. These efforts contributed to the establishment of the IEA in 1974 as a principal institutional mechanism for enhancing global energy cooperation among industrialized nations. Read more>>

Fostering low-carbon growth

On April 11, 2013, in Project Management, by Joe Nyangon
0

Here’s a great video of a speech delivered by Lord Nicholas Stern and sponsored by the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and World Resources Institute (WRI). Lord Stern, who is the chairman of the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment at the London School of Economics, explained how climate risks have changed six […]

Here’s a great video of a speech delivered by Lord Nicholas Stern and sponsored by the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and World Resources Institute (WRI). Lord Stern, who is the chairman of the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment at the London School of Economics, explained how climate risks have changed six years after the publication of the Stern Review report, and what organizations and governments can do to transition to a low-carbon economy future. For more, check out the transcript of the speech and IMF Managing Director Christine Lagarde’s introductory remarks, and Stern Review .

How the art and science of delivery is changing

On April 10, 2013, in Energy & Environmental Policy, by Joe Nyangon
0

As the payoff from investment in advanced-analytics management and big data revolution becomes real, the art and science of delivery is on the upswing as institutions share knowledge, tools and experience in problem solving. For instance, public policy institutions are full of good ideas on how to solve complex social problems, improve STEM pedagogy and […]

As the payoff from investment in advanced-analytics management and big data revolution becomes real, the art and science of delivery is on the upswing as institutions share knowledge, tools and experience in problem solving. For instance, public policy institutions are full of good ideas on how to solve complex social problems, improve STEM pedagogy and student learning, cure diseases, and produce energy (at scale, efficiently, and sustainably). But what has been missing in this process is the ability to implement simple, pragmatic and scalable solutions to effect positive social change. This seems to be changing, pretty fast, however, as organizations integrate their stovepipes of data across operations and sectors to provide powerful insights.

Speaking at this year’s annual meeting plenary session, World Bank Group President Jim Yong Kim addressed the facts and processes germaine to the next frontier in advancing the science of delivery. “Effective delivery demands context-specific knowledge. It requires constant adjustments, a willingness to take smart risks, and a relentless focus on the details of implementation,” he observed.

McKinsey has also developed an anthology of leading delivery models by social thinkers and practitioners in health care, smart energy, financial services, governance, and food security to improve development outcomes.

Tagged with:
 

Who’s leading the low-carbon race?

On March 26, 2013, in Renewable Energy Markets, by Joe Nyangon
0

The centre of clean energy gravity is fast shifting to Asia, with China taking the lead. In a new report developed by Australian think tank The Climate Institute and GE, China has improved its global low-carbon competitiveness index significantly. The report ranks France, Japan, China, South Korea and the UK in the top five positions. […]

The centre of clean energy gravity is fast shifting to Asia, with China taking the lead. In a new report developed by Australian think tank The Climate Institute and GE, China has improved its global low-carbon competitiveness index significantly.

The report ranks France, Japan, China, South Korea and the UK in the top five positions. China has leapt ahead of its previous ranking from 7th to 3rd while U.S. is now 11th down from 8th position. Australia is ranked 17th. The report attributes the latest decline in U.S. ranking to “lower public equity investment in clean energy, shrinking high-tech exports and a surge in reliance on emission intensive air freight.”

LCCI2013a

China’s growth in cleantech investment is boosted by high-tech exports and a rise in global public equity investment in clean energy. Read more

PageLines